My Blog

By Drs Yung & Jelinek, DDS
February 26, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: family dentist  

Searching for a dentist your entire family will love? Family dentists provide dental care to people of all ages. A family dentist can diagnose,family dentist treat, and manage your whole family's oral health care needs. Dr. James Jelinek and Dr. Susan Yung are some of the finest family dentists in Warrenton, VA. Here are some reasons to consider a family dentist.

1. Dental Care Services- Family dentists provide dental services for the whole family. These dental practitioners work with their patients to manage their oral health. Dental examinations, professional dental cleanings, and sealants are part of the job, along with treatment of dental problems like cavities and tooth infections. Family dentists also offer cosmetic dentistry procedures to enhance your smile. 

2. One-Stop-Shopping- One-stop-shopping dental practices have become very popular in the United States. With the hectic pace of our crazy-busy lifestyles, we all look for ways to simplify our lives and save time. A trip to a family dentist in Warrenton, VA, can mean fewer office visits. Imagine how much time you will save by having all of your family's needs met in one place! 

3. A Lifetime of Dental Care- Your kids can see a family dentist throughout their entire lives. Pediatric dentists only provide dental care to infants and children through adolescence. When you take your children to a pediatric dentist, they will receive dental care into their teen years. After that time, they will need to find another dental provider.

Healthy smiles are happy smiles! Call our dental office at 540-349-0033 today to schedule a dental appointment in Warrenton, VA. You can count on us to provide your entire family with quality dental care in a comfortable, family-oriented environment. Remember, a healthy smile is a beautiful smile!

By Drs Yung & Jelinek, DDS
February 12, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants   bone graft  

Due to financial circumstances, people often have a lost tooth restored with a removable partial denture, an effective appliance that restores function and a degree of aesthetic appearance. Later, though, they may want to improve both function and appearance with a dental implant.

If this describes you, you’re making a great choice. Dental implants are the closest technology we have to a natural tooth. But there may be a roadblock to your implant, especially if a long time has passed since your tooth loss—there may not be enough bone at the site to place an implant.

The heart of an implant is a titanium metal post surgically imbedded in the jawbone. The titanium naturally attracts bone cells, which grow and adhere to it to form a solid hold that can support a porcelain crown or other restorations like bridges or dentures. But to achieve a natural appearance it’s important that the implant is placed in the right location. To achieve that requires adequate bone.

But there may not be adequate bone if the tooth has been missing for a while. The forces generated when we chew travel through the teeth to the jawbone, which stimulates bone growth. If that stimulus is absent because of a missing tooth, new bone cells may not replace older ones at a healthy rate and the total bone volume begins to diminish. A denture can’t compensate and, in fact, accelerates bone loss.

But there may be a solution: bone grafting. With this procedure we place a donor bone graft into the area of bone deficiency some time before implant surgery. The graft serves as a scaffold for new bone cells to grow upon. Hopefully, this will produce enough healthy bone to support an implant. If the bone deficiency is minor, we may place the implant and the bone graft at the same time.

If you have experienced bone loss, we must first determine the amount of bone at the missing tooth site and whether grafting is a viable option. Bone grafting postpones your implant, but the delay will be worth the wait if we’re successful. With increased bone volume you’ll be able to obtain a new tooth that’s superior to your current restoration.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Drs Yung & Jelinek, DDS
February 04, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: porcelain veneers  

Porcelain veneers are one of the best ways to transform your teeth’s appearance with only a small amount of tooth preparation. But even that small amount could leave a veneered tooth permanently altered.

As the name implies, veneers are thin layers of custom-designed porcelain bonded to the outside of a tooth to cover defects. They’re usually ideal for minor chipping, staining or even slight tooth misalignments. But although they’re thin—often just a millimeter or so in thickness—they can still make a tooth appear or feel bulky.

To reduce this extra width, we usually need to remove some of the tooth’s surface enamel. Since enamel doesn’t replenish itself, this alteration could mean the tooth will require a restoration from then on.

But now, you may be able to take advantage of new advances in this popular restoration: No-Prep or Minimal Prep veneers that involve little to no tooth alteration. In most cases they’re simply bonded to the teeth with only slight enamel reshaping.

Because of their ultra-thinness, No-Prep veneers (usually between 0.3 to 0.5 mm, as thin as a contact lens) are bonded directly to teeth that are practically untouched beforehand. A Minimal Prep veneer usually requires only enamel reshaping with an abrasive tool before it’s placed. And unlike traditional veneers, they can often be removed if needed to return the teeth to their original form without another restoration.

These new veneers are best for people with small teeth, often from wear due to teeth grinding, narrow smiles (the side teeth aren’t visible while smiling), or slightly misshapen teeth like underdeveloped teeth that can appear peg-shaped. But people with oversized teeth, some malocclusions (bad bites) or similar dental situations may still require enamel removal to avoid bulkiness even with ultra-thin veneers.

If you don’t have those kinds of issues and your teeth are reasonably healthy, we can apply No-Prep or Minimal Prep veneers in as few as two appointments. The result could be life-changing as you gain a new smile you’re more than happy to share.

If you would like more information on no-prep veneers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor article “No-Prep Porcelain Veneers.”

By Drs Yung & Jelinek, DDS
January 20, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants   smoking  

If you smoke, you know better than anyone how a hard a habit it is to kick. If you want to quit, it helps to have a motivating reason—like lowering your risk for cancer, cardiovascular disease or similar conditions.

Here’s another reason for quitting tobacco: it could be making your teeth and gums less healthy. And, if you’re facing a restoration like dental implants, smoking can make that process harder or even increase the risk of failure.

So, to give your willpower some needed pep talk material, here are 3 reasons why smoking doesn’t mix with dental implants.

Inhaled smoke damages mouth tissues. Though you may not realize it, the smoke from your cigarette or cigar is hot enough to burn the top layer of skin cells in your mouth, which then thickens them. This could affect your salivary glands causing them to produce less saliva, which in turn could set off a chain of events that increases your risk of tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease. The end result might be bone loss, which could make installing dental implants difficult if not impossible.

Nicotine restricts healthy blood flow. Nicotine, the chemical tobacco users crave, can restrict blood flow in the tiny vessels that course through the mouth membranes and gums. With less blood flow, these tissues may not receive enough antibodies to fight infection and fully facilitate healing, which could interfere with the integration of bone and implants that create their durable hold. Slower healing, as well as the increased chances of infection, could interrupt this integration process.

Smoking contributes to other diseases that impact oral health. Smoking’s direct effect on the mouth isn’t the only impact it could have on your oral health. As is well known, tobacco use can increase the risk of systemic conditions like cardiovascular and lung disease, and cancer. These conditions may also trigger inflammation—and a number of studies are showing this triggered inflammatory response could also affect your body’s ability to fight bacterial infections in the mouth. Less healthy teeth, gums and underlying bone work against your chances of long-term success with implants.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants & Smoking: What are the Risks?

By Drs Yung & Jelinek, DDS
January 05, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures

In her decades-long career, renowned actress Kathy Bates has won Golden Globes, Emmys, and many other honors. Bates began acting in her twenties, but didn't achieve national recognition until she won the best actress Oscar for Misery — when she was 42 years old! “I was told early on that because of my physique and my look, I'd probably blossom more in my middle age,” she recently told Dear Doctor magazine. “[That] has certainly been true.” So if there's one lesson we can take from her success, it might be that persistence pays off.

When it comes to her smile, Kathy also recognizes the value of persistence. Now 67, the veteran actress had orthodontic treatment in her 50's to straighten her teeth. Yet she is still conscientious about wearing her retainer. “I wear a retainer every night,” she said. “I got lazy about it once, and then it was very difficult to put the retainer back in. So I was aware that the teeth really do move.”

Indeed they do. In fact, the ability to move teeth is what makes orthodontic treatment work. By applying consistent and gentle forces, the teeth can be shifted into better positions in the smile. That's called the active stage of orthodontic treatment. Once that stage is over, another begins: the retention stage. The purpose of retention is to keep that straightened smile looking as good as it did when the braces came off. And that's where the retainer comes in.

There are several different kinds of retainers, but all have the same purpose: To hold the teeth in their new positions and keep them from shifting back to where they were. We sometimes say teeth have a “memory” — not literally, but in the sense that if left alone, teeth tend to migrate back to their former locations. And if you've worn orthodontic appliances, like braces or aligners, that means right back where you started before treatment.

By holding the teeth in place, retainers help stabilize them in their new positions. They allow new bone and ligaments to re-form and mature around them, and give the gums time to remodel themselves. This process can take months to years to be complete. But you may not need to wear a retainer all the time: Often, removable retainers are worn 24 hours a day at first; later they are worn only at night. We will let you know what's best in your individual situation.

So take a tip from Kathy Bates, star of the hit TV series American Horror Story, and wear your retainer as instructed. That's the best way to keep your straight new smile from changing back to the way it was — and to keep a bad dream from coming true.

If you would like more information about orthodontic retainers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more about this topic in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Why Orthodontic Retainers?” and “The Importance of Orthodontic Retainers.” The interview with Kathy Bates appears in the latest issue of Dear Doctor.

This website includes materials that are protected by copyright, or other proprietary rights. Transmission or reproduction of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use, as defined in the copyright laws, requires the written permission of the copyright owners.